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Hawaii Should Snuff its Irrational Smoking Ban

30 Jun

Hawaii

The state of Hawaii is known for surf, sand, picturesque sunsets and hard bodies. The state tourism board and glossy brochures persuade vacationers from the mainland to hop on over for swimming, snorkeling, surfing, fishing, hiking around volcanoes and more.

The state oozes with the image of health and vitality; which may be why state politicians have decided to show no aloha for tobacco.

On June 19, Governor David Ige signed legislation that would ban anyone under the age of 21 from buying or smoking cigarettes. The ban also applies to electronic smoking devices and doesn’t include a grandfather clause, so a 20-year-old who can smoke legally now will be forced to quit cold turkey when the law takes effect on January 1.

Speaking at the bill signing in Honolulu, Gov. Ige said, “Taking this step forward to prohibit anyone under the age of 21 of smoking, purchasing, possessing, is another step to reduce the impact that smoking has on our community.”

Any shop caught selling tobacco to an adult between the ages of 18 and 21 will be fined $500 for the first offense and each violation after that will range between $500 to $2,000. Anybody under 21 caught smoking by the cops will be subject to a $10 fine for the first offense and $50 thereafter. People in Hawaii buy Davidoff cigarettes online from http://www.mydiscountcigarette.net/buy/davidoff

This law also applies to the 116,000 active duty service members and their families who are stationed in the Aloha state, many of whom are smokers – all with the added indignity of them having zero say in the process because many soldiers are registered to vote in their home states.

According to a 2011 Department of Defense health-related behaviors survey, more than 1 in 4 active-duty service members ages 18-20 smoke.

The Marine Corps has the most young smokers by percentage, at 31.6 percent. The Army, which has more than 22,000 soldiers on Hawaii, comes in second, at 30.8 percent, followed by the Navy, at 25.5 percent, the Coast Guard, at 18.2 percent, and the Air Force, with 17.5 percent.

And now the Hawaiian state government is telling these brave men and women that they’re adult enough to enlist in the military, fly helicopters, shoot guns and put their lives on the line to protect our freedom, but not adult enough to make their own health decisions.

I thought we resolved the debate on what constitutes an adult with the 26th Amendment to the Constitution in 1971, when we lowered the voting age in federal elections from 21 to 18 years?

 
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Posted by on June 30, 2015 in Tobacco News

 

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