RSS

Higher Taxes Help to Reduce Smoking Among Youth

Young Woman Smoking

For each 10-cent increase in cigarette taxes, the likelihood that a youth would start smoking decreased by about 3 percent. Taxes did not affect the odds of current smoking for adolescents and young adults.

Youth were 20 percent less likely to be currently smoking in areas with smoke-free bar laws, and tended to smoke fewer days out of the month in these places, as reported in JAMA Pediatrics.

“Young people are going to bars a lot, and even for those who aren’t, bar culture is important to them,” Glantz said.

The proposed $2 cigarette tax in California, if passed, would decrease youth smoking by about 40 percent, he said.

Historically, there has been conflict between groups pushing for smoke-free laws and those concerned with youth smoking initiation, he said. Smoke-free laws were thought of primarily as a tool to reduce secondhand smoke exposure.

“There’s really no conflict there,” Glantz said. “Smoke free policies are prevention policies too.”

Ideally, policymakers will combine smoke-free laws and cigarette taxes, which would have the maximum effect, he said.

Some are skeptical about higher taxes effects, because they will purchase Kiss Superslims Energy online.

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 10, 2015 in Tobacco Articles

 

Tags: , ,

Senator Calls for €3 Increase on Cigarettes

Cigarettes

Professor John Crown, a Senator and cancer specialist, has called on the government to consider a new tax of at least €3 on packets of cigarettes.

The oncologist was speaking to Newstalk when he suggested the government should up the price of cigarettes considerably.

His argument comes from the perspective of a medical practitioner working in one of Dublin’s major hospitals where he witnesses the detrimental effects the addiction has on smokers and their families.

“When you increase the price of smoking, you do reduce the amount of smoking,” Mr Crown said.

“Anything we can do that makes fewer people smoke and put themselves at terrible risk for terrible diseases is to be encouraged.”

Colette Fitzpatrick quizzed Professor Crown on the smokers who will be hit financiallyif the tax were to be introduced.

“This is an addiction,” he said. “It is caused by the tobacco industry deliberately addicting people to their products.

“Five of every six smokers began as an underage child. If children don’t take up smoking, there will be a decreasing pool of people to buy the products made by the tobacco company.

“What punishes smokers is having their legs amputated in their 40s or 50s. What punishes smokers families is losing their mother or their father or their brother or their sister or their spouse.

“It’s not the couple of extra euros on the price of the smoking that punishes them, those are the punishments. Those are death sentences.”

Smoker do not welcome the idea of prices increase and that is why they are going to buy cigarettes at low prices from the web.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 14, 2015 in Tobacco News

 

Tags: ,

Limiting Teenage Smoking is Top Priority in Plymouth

Smoking Teenage Girl

PLYMOUTH’S director of public health has branded limiting teenage smoking “a top priority”, after a study found one in eight 15-year-old girls in Plymouth currently smoke. Statistics from the Health and Social Care Information Centre released earlier this week show just over 13 per cent of 15-year-old girls in the city and 5.6 per cent of boys are smokers. Teenagers are attracted most of all by flavoured little cigars such as Captain Black http://www.mydiscountcigarette.net/buy/captain-black

Alarmingly, the figures also revealed that around 13 per cent of Plymouth 15-year-old do not consider smoking to be dangerous. The new data, published in a report called Health and Wellbeing of 15-year-old in England: Smoking Prevalence, indicated more than a quarter of youngsters from across Plymouth have admitted to smoking at least once before – well above the national averages.

Professor Kelechi Nnoaham, Plymouth’s director of public health, admitted the Council and city-based health organisations face a tough task in limiting teenage smokers.

“Plymouth City Council, as the strategic lead for public health in Plymouth, recognises that reducing smoking rates in the city is one of our top priorities, and we know that we need to start as early as possible.

“There are no sudden solutions to getting young people to stop – rather it is a range of initiatives which are designed to make Plymouth a healthier city and ensure everyone lives long, enjoyable, healthy lives.

“Smoking is one of four lifestyle behaviours – along with excessive drinking, inactivity and unhealthy diet – which lead to 54% of deaths in Plymouth, which is why we’ve launched our Thrive Plymouth scheme to encourage healthier lifestyles.

“We know that if we grow up free from tobacco, drink alcohol in moderation, exercise regularly and watch what we eat – we can make a big difference to our health and live longer, healthier lives.”

The Oxford graduate, who assumed the role of director of public health last year after a successful spell in a similar position in Bristol, did draw some positives from yesterday’s findings.

“According to this survey, the vast majority of young people do not smoke – with over 90% of 15 year old people reporting that they do not smoke.

“This figure is broadly in line with the estimate made by our more extensive school based local survey carried out earlier in the year.

“Research has consistently shown that many smokers start to use tobacco in their early teens so we need to do all we can to help prevent young people taking up smoking in the first place.

“Proposed changes to bring in plain cigarette packaging may help with this but we also need to continue to work with local schools, via our healthcare providers Plymouth Community Healthcare, to work with young people about benefits of growing up free from tobacco.”

Given the rise of e-cigarettes and legal highs in recent years, the study also examined the effect of “other tobacco products”.

While just three per cent of teens polled said they currently use e-cigarettes, more than 15 per cent admitted to smoking them at least once or twice. 11 per cent of 15-year-olds, meanwhile, told the survey they had used alternative products to tobacco.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 7, 2015 in Tobacco News

 

Tags: ,

Minneapolis City Council Restricts Flavored Tobacco Sales

Cigarettes

Flavored cigars will no longer be sold in many Minneapolis stores starting in January.

The City Council voted Friday to ban flavored tobacco products at convenience stores, according to the Star Tribune (http://strib.mn/1Momrph).

The federal government banned flavored cigarettes in 2009, but other tobacco products are still sold with fruit and candy flavors.

Council Member Elizabeth Glidden called the ban a “major policy change” that will have a significant effect on young people in the city. She said it is up to cities to fill in the gaps left from federal action aimed at curbing youth smoking.

“It seems like a challenge that we as local communities need to take action to address,” she told the crowd at Friday’s meeting. “You have come to us with proposals on how to make that happen.”

Currently, cigars sold in flavors like grape, strawberry and chocolate can be sold at more than 300 locations. Starting in January that drops to fewer than two dozen adult-only tobacco shops.

The vote followed several weeks of debate between anti-tobacco advocates who argued that flavored products were designed to attract young smokers and shop owners who fear a significant hit to their businesses.

The measure passed on Friday also set minimum prices for both flavored and unflavored cigars at $2.60.

Smokers who want to continue to smoke flavoured cigarettes should buy Captain Black Cherise http://www.cigarettestime.com/captain-black/cherise.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 21, 2015 in Tobacco News

 

Tags: , ,

Smokers in Hong Kong

Regulated by the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, warnings and messages on smoking should be 50 percent or more of the principal display areas but shall be no less than 30 percent of the principal display areas. Hong Kong had already reached the standard and the CTA hoped the government would stop increasing the percentage.

The CTA also warned that unintended consequences maybe caused by the change. An 85-percent warning label would cover too much space on the packets, it said, making it harder for consumers to distinguish one brand from another, thus undermining business competition.

Smaller free space for manufacturers may also lead to piracy problems as the anti-counterfeit labels are smaller and easier to fabricate, it said.

Some manufacturers need to give up their original brand designs, the alliance said, and accused the authorities of breaching the city’s trademark laws.They say that people want to buy Style Selection Blue in original packs.

At present, only Thailand and Nepal have applied health warning labels of more than 85 percent in size.

The CTA urged the government to review its proposals by conducing more research and consultations and wait for further information from the two countries so that it can use them for reference.

The Council on Smoking and Health (COSH), a statutory body in the city promoting tobacco control and health improvement, felt the opposite. It said the proposal is a right decision to make.

It appeared tough on endorsing the move and urged the government to push for a even tighter control, which includes a unitary packing order with brand names only written in standard fonts. The COSH thought it a “must do” to increase people’s awareness of the harm that smoking would do to a person.

The Department of Health said the health warnings are an important part of the city’s tobacco control work and do have positive effects.

Under WTO guidelines, the warnings and messages should “cover the cigarette packet as much as possible”, a department’s spokesman said.

The LegCo’s Panel on Health Services will hold a special meeting on July 6 to discuss the issue.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 7, 2015 in Tobacco News

 

Tags: ,

Hawaii Should Snuff its Irrational Smoking Ban

Hawaii

The state of Hawaii is known for surf, sand, picturesque sunsets and hard bodies. The state tourism board and glossy brochures persuade vacationers from the mainland to hop on over for swimming, snorkeling, surfing, fishing, hiking around volcanoes and more.

The state oozes with the image of health and vitality; which may be why state politicians have decided to show no aloha for tobacco.

On June 19, Governor David Ige signed legislation that would ban anyone under the age of 21 from buying or smoking cigarettes. The ban also applies to electronic smoking devices and doesn’t include a grandfather clause, so a 20-year-old who can smoke legally now will be forced to quit cold turkey when the law takes effect on January 1.

Speaking at the bill signing in Honolulu, Gov. Ige said, “Taking this step forward to prohibit anyone under the age of 21 of smoking, purchasing, possessing, is another step to reduce the impact that smoking has on our community.”

Any shop caught selling tobacco to an adult between the ages of 18 and 21 will be fined $500 for the first offense and each violation after that will range between $500 to $2,000. Anybody under 21 caught smoking by the cops will be subject to a $10 fine for the first offense and $50 thereafter. People in Hawaii buy Davidoff cigarettes online from http://www.mydiscountcigarette.net/buy/davidoff

This law also applies to the 116,000 active duty service members and their families who are stationed in the Aloha state, many of whom are smokers – all with the added indignity of them having zero say in the process because many soldiers are registered to vote in their home states.

According to a 2011 Department of Defense health-related behaviors survey, more than 1 in 4 active-duty service members ages 18-20 smoke.

The Marine Corps has the most young smokers by percentage, at 31.6 percent. The Army, which has more than 22,000 soldiers on Hawaii, comes in second, at 30.8 percent, followed by the Navy, at 25.5 percent, the Coast Guard, at 18.2 percent, and the Air Force, with 17.5 percent.

And now the Hawaiian state government is telling these brave men and women that they’re adult enough to enlist in the military, fly helicopters, shoot guns and put their lives on the line to protect our freedom, but not adult enough to make their own health decisions.

I thought we resolved the debate on what constitutes an adult with the 26th Amendment to the Constitution in 1971, when we lowered the voting age in federal elections from 21 to 18 years?

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 30, 2015 in Tobacco News

 

Tags: ,

Smoking Ban to Help Clear Air for Alfresco Diners in the Hills

Smoking

SMOKERS have less than a fortnight to butt out when they are dining outdoors in the Hills.

From July 6 smokers will not be able to light up within 4m of a restaurant, cafe, club and pub.

The new regulations are part of the State Government’s Smoke-free Environment Act, which makes a number of outdoor public places smoke-free.

In 2011, Hills shire councillors voted to ban smoking in alfresco dining areas in Castle Hill’s main street between Showground Rd and Castle St.

Cr Robyn Preston, who was the driving force behind the council ban, said she had received emails from residents since then calling for the whole of Castle Hill’s outdoor eating precinct to be smoke free.

“Fortunately from July 6 that can be achieved,” she said.

“As an advocate for the NSW Cancer Council, and having lost my father when I was 17 from a smoking related illness, this was something I wanted to achieve for the community.”

Hills Cancer Council Network chairman James Butler said he was pleased with the new law.

“People will now be able to dine alfresco without having to inhale other people’s smoke,” he said.

“We now know the effects of second-hand smoking are just as damaging as directly smoking.”

Smokers dining in the main street at Castle Hill last week were not bothered by the regulations.

“It’s fair enough,” Kristie Nay, of Castle Hill, said. “There’s kids around and people want to enjoy their lunch without smoking.”

Smoker Ruth O’Donohue, of Hornsby, said she agreed with the new regulations. She buys Style Selection Rose online.

“There’s enough pollution in the world as it is,” she said.
On-the-spot fines of $300 for individuals and up to $5500 for occupiers will apply.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 23, 2015 in Tobacco News

 

Tags: ,