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Higher Taxes Help to Reduce Smoking Among Youth

Young Woman Smoking

For each 10-cent increase in cigarette taxes, the likelihood that a youth would start smoking decreased by about 3 percent. Taxes did not affect the odds of current smoking for adolescents and young adults.

Youth were 20 percent less likely to be currently smoking in areas with smoke-free bar laws, and tended to smoke fewer days out of the month in these places, as reported in JAMA Pediatrics.

“Young people are going to bars a lot, and even for those who aren’t, bar culture is important to them,” Glantz said.

The proposed $2 cigarette tax in California, if passed, would decrease youth smoking by about 40 percent, he said.

Historically, there has been conflict between groups pushing for smoke-free laws and those concerned with youth smoking initiation, he said. Smoke-free laws were thought of primarily as a tool to reduce secondhand smoke exposure.

“There’s really no conflict there,” Glantz said. “Smoke free policies are prevention policies too.”

Ideally, policymakers will combine smoke-free laws and cigarette taxes, which would have the maximum effect, he said.

Some are skeptical about higher taxes effects, because they will purchase Kiss Superslims Energy online.

 
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Posted by on September 10, 2015 in Tobacco Articles

 

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Limiting Teenage Smoking is Top Priority in Plymouth

Smoking Teenage Girl

PLYMOUTH’S director of public health has branded limiting teenage smoking “a top priority”, after a study found one in eight 15-year-old girls in Plymouth currently smoke. Statistics from the Health and Social Care Information Centre released earlier this week show just over 13 per cent of 15-year-old girls in the city and 5.6 per cent of boys are smokers. Teenagers are attracted most of all by flavoured little cigars such as Captain Black http://www.mydiscountcigarette.net/buy/captain-black

Alarmingly, the figures also revealed that around 13 per cent of Plymouth 15-year-old do not consider smoking to be dangerous. The new data, published in a report called Health and Wellbeing of 15-year-old in England: Smoking Prevalence, indicated more than a quarter of youngsters from across Plymouth have admitted to smoking at least once before – well above the national averages.

Professor Kelechi Nnoaham, Plymouth’s director of public health, admitted the Council and city-based health organisations face a tough task in limiting teenage smokers.

“Plymouth City Council, as the strategic lead for public health in Plymouth, recognises that reducing smoking rates in the city is one of our top priorities, and we know that we need to start as early as possible.

“There are no sudden solutions to getting young people to stop – rather it is a range of initiatives which are designed to make Plymouth a healthier city and ensure everyone lives long, enjoyable, healthy lives.

“Smoking is one of four lifestyle behaviours – along with excessive drinking, inactivity and unhealthy diet – which lead to 54% of deaths in Plymouth, which is why we’ve launched our Thrive Plymouth scheme to encourage healthier lifestyles.

“We know that if we grow up free from tobacco, drink alcohol in moderation, exercise regularly and watch what we eat – we can make a big difference to our health and live longer, healthier lives.”

The Oxford graduate, who assumed the role of director of public health last year after a successful spell in a similar position in Bristol, did draw some positives from yesterday’s findings.

“According to this survey, the vast majority of young people do not smoke – with over 90% of 15 year old people reporting that they do not smoke.

“This figure is broadly in line with the estimate made by our more extensive school based local survey carried out earlier in the year.

“Research has consistently shown that many smokers start to use tobacco in their early teens so we need to do all we can to help prevent young people taking up smoking in the first place.

“Proposed changes to bring in plain cigarette packaging may help with this but we also need to continue to work with local schools, via our healthcare providers Plymouth Community Healthcare, to work with young people about benefits of growing up free from tobacco.”

Given the rise of e-cigarettes and legal highs in recent years, the study also examined the effect of “other tobacco products”.

While just three per cent of teens polled said they currently use e-cigarettes, more than 15 per cent admitted to smoking them at least once or twice. 11 per cent of 15-year-olds, meanwhile, told the survey they had used alternative products to tobacco.

 
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Posted by on August 7, 2015 in Tobacco News

 

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Smoking Rates Are Down

Smoker

First, the good news: Smoking rates are down significantly in 26 states. The bad news? The use of smokeless tobacco (also known as dip, snuff or chew) is up in four states, while using both cigarettes and smokeless tobacco is up significantly in five states. Smokers prefer menthol cigarettes in most cases and their favorite brand is Vogue Superslims Mente http://www.mydiscountcigarette.net/buy/vogue/super-slims-menthe

“Although overall cigarette smoking prevalence has declined significantly in recent years in many states, the overall use of smokeless tobacco and concurrent cigarette and smokeless tobacco has remained unchanged in most states and increased in some states,” summed up researchers for the Centers for Disease Control, which published the data in their weekly Morbidity and Mortality report.

From 2011 to 2013, four states showed increased smokeless tobacco use: Louisiana, Montana, South Carolina and West Virginia. Only two states — Ohio and Tennessee — exhibited decreases. In terms of total use, Massachusetts and the District of Columbia reported the lowest numbers of smokeless tobacco, at 1.5 percent, in 2013. In contrast, West Virginia reported the highest use, at 9.4 percent, with Wyoming and Montana coming in second and third, at 8.8 percent and 8 percent, respectively.

Breaking down tobacco use by state helps health officials create more targeted state and local tobacco policies, explained CDC researcher Kimberly Nguyen in an email to HuffPost.

“It’s important to note that the states with lower tobacco use prevalence typically have more robust tobacco control programs and greater adoption of evidence-based population level interventions,” she wrote.

 
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Posted by on May 26, 2015 in Tobacco News

 

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Impact of the Plain Packaging Reforms on Tobacco Use

The November 2013 study Mr Argent referred to was conducted by London Economics, a UK economic and policy consultancy firm, and commissioned by Philip Morris International, which sells branded cigarettes in 180 markets. London Economics surveyed Australian adults three times: between July and October 2012, before the new regulations began; in March 2013, three months after their full implementation; and in July 2013. The November report was “an interim assessment” of the firm’s analysis of the impact of plain packaging on smoking prevalence.

The study did not directly address the impact of plain packaging on potential new smokers, despite this being the government’s stated policy priority. It found that the largest group of tobacco consumers, those who smoke daily, fell from 20.4 per cent of the adult population before plain packs became mandatory to 19.5 per cent three months afterwards. The number of daily smokers then rose to 20 per cent in July 2013. Respondents who said they were weekly but not daily smokers initially fell, then returned to the pre-implementation level of 2.1 per cent. “Less than weekly” smoking fell from 2.3 per cent to 1.9 per cent and then rose to 2.2 per cent.

The study also found the number of people who claimed never to have smoked increased from 45.6 per cent in the second half of 2012 to 46.6 per cent in July 2013. Those numbers represent a reduction of 0.4 per cent in the number of Australian adults smoking daily and a 1 per cent increase in the number of adults who had never smoked (suggesting more of those turning 18 do not smoke). The report’s authors said that “from a statistical perspective, none of these changes were different from zero”.

They conclude that “over the timeframe of the analysis, the data does not demonstrate that there has been a change in smoking prevalence following the introduction of plain packaging and larger health warnings…” The second report Mr Argent referred to was a study of the sale of illicit tobacco in Australia. It was conducted by accounting firm KPMG and commissioned by Imperial Tobacco, British American Tobacco and Philip Morris.

The report estimated that the overall level of tobacco consumption in Australia was 17.4 million kilograms in the year to June 2013, the same level as the year before. It said consumption of legal products fell from 15.3 million kilograms to 15.1, while consumption of illicit products increased correspondingly. The KPMG report did not evaluate the impact of the plain packaging reforms on consumption.

Imperial Tobacco, which produces cheap Davidoff cigarettes, recently argued against the introduction of plain packaging in Britain, stating “following the introduction of standardised packaging in Australia, smoking prevalence has not been affected”.

It cited the KPMG report’s finding that overall consumption had remained stable. However, Imperial Tobacco’s submission, dated January 10, urged the UK government to postpone deciding on plain packaging legislation because there was insufficient evidence about the impact of the Australian reforms. It noted that the latest national statistics from Australia covering smoking prevalence were for the end of 2012 and there had been no data or anecdotal evidence on youth smoking rates in Australia after 2011.

“We are not aware of any national statistics from Australia… covering the period since standardised packaging was mandated,” the submission said. “We consider this to be an essential requirement for a proper assessment of the policy’s impact.” The Australian Government was planning a review on the plain packaging measures in December 2014 “and we would expect other governments to wait until this review has been conducted before making any decisions,” it said.

 
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Posted by on January 28, 2014 in Tobacco News

 

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